Meet the Livestream Shopping Founders Transforming US E-Commerce

Brahm Buck

Livestream shopping, set to become a $6 billion market this year, is gaining momentum in the US. Large retailers like Amazon and small businesses alike are tapping into livestream and video sales. Five startups are challenging popular social-media apps to become the go-to livestream platform. See more stories on Insider’s […]

  • Livestream shopping, set to become a $6 billion market this year, is gaining momentum in the US.
  • Large retailers like Amazon and small businesses alike are tapping into livestream and video sales.
  • Five startups are challenging popular social-media apps to become the go-to livestream platform.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Amazon, Sephora, Uniqlo, Nordstrom, and Walmart have all invested in the future of video and livestream shopping, but there’s also a growing community of smaller retailers, collectors, and designers expanding their customer base with these sales channels.

During the pandemic, livestreaming helped store owners sell products virtually while their shops were closed. Now, as the US economy reopens and restrictions are lifted, these business owners continue to reach new shoppers through online livestreams.

Livestream shopping in the US is estimated to become a $6 billion market this year and $25 billion by 2023, according to the research firm Coresight Research.

Behind the trend’s emergence in the US stand five venture-backed companies that are challenging the dominant social-media platforms like Facebook, TikTok, and Instagram to become the go-to host of livestream shopping. Insider spoke to the founders and chief executives of these startups to understand what makes each one different. 

Learn about each app and then read about how businesses can use them.

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