The Best Ecommerce Marketing Apps & Tools to Use in 2021 with Nik Sharma [Podcast]

Brahm Buck

Nik Sharma, of Sharma Brands joins Search Engine Journal Founder Loren Baker to talk about the best chat, email, loyalty, and other ecommerce apps you can use, how they work, and how they help with long-term customer retention after the initial SEO sale. Here is the entire transcript of the […]

Nik Sharma, of Sharma Brands joins Search Engine Journal Founder Loren Baker to talk about the best chat, email, loyalty, and other ecommerce apps you can use, how they work, and how they help with long-term customer retention after the initial SEO sale.

Here is the entire transcript of the show (please excuse any transcription errors) :

Loren Baker:

Hi everybody. This is Loren Baker, founder of Search Engine Journal. Welcome to today’s edition of The Search Engine Journal Show. With me today we’re going to get a little bit into e-commerce and DDC with our special guest Nik Sharma. Hey Nik, how’s it going?

Nik Sharma:

How’s it going, man? Thanks for having me.

Loren Baker:

Absolutely. Absolutely. It’s always a treat. So Nick, one of our mutual friends introduced us and recommended you for the show [Raj Nisia. 00:00:31]. Raj is formerly of Yext, JACo, GoDaddy I guess and then also is now Refersion. So Nik, if you both are in either New York or Miami at the same time, say, “Hi,” to him for me unless you’re crossing paths at the airport. But Nick again, thanks for coming on the show. I want to take a little bit of a different dive today into DDC and e-commerce. So if you wouldn’t mind introducing yourself and tell our listeners and viewers a little bit about how you got started, what you’re doing now and what you’re focusing on, that’d be fantastic.

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Nik Sharma:

Absolutely. So I, as a kid, I was always just… both my parents were entrepreneurs as I was growing up. And so the thought of running something was always very appealing. When I was really young, I would take our stuffed animals and create a fake little shop in our living room. And with my desk lamp ended up becoming my scanner and I loved the whole concept of a register. And I loved reading the Sunday paper and getting the ads for Circuit City and Radio Shack and making a list and comparing prices. So I was always interested in buying and selling and merchandising and things like that. And then as I got older, I got really good at with selling and presentations. If I wanted an iPod, I had to make a PowerPoint as to why. When I found out that we were with AT&T but Verizon had cheaper cell service, it was making a presentation as to why we should switch.

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Nik Sharma:

And so I had that DNA as a kid. And then when I got to high school, I was just a horrible student. For the life of me, I could study for hours for a history test or an English test. But when the time came to put the pen to paper on a test, it just… the metrics were just never there that I needed. And so I was like, my little immigrant hat. I’m thinking, “Okay, I got to figure out how I’m going to make money so that one day I’m going to have a house with a picket white fence and I’ll be able to pay for it.” And so I was in high school. I never really had a job per se, like working in a restaurant or a store. I was a DJ.

Nik Sharma:

So I would go DJ Sweet 16 parties, wedding receptions, bar mitzvahs and so I learned the whole concept of going out and selling myself and how to list myself on different sites, whether it’s a site where you go find DJs or a site like Craigslist or responding to inquiries, or even just cold emailing. And so I got good at social as well, just as about to that.

Nik Sharma:

And also just being a kid and I thought, “Okay, what if I could help local businesses in our neighborhood and community with their own marketing?” Something as simple as, if it’s a local pizza shop, like how do we get more kids in? Okay, let’s put something out on Facebook where it’s like, you show this ad when you come in and you get a free soda with every two slices.

Nik Sharma:

And so I did that for a little bit, but thought it just wasn’t as fun. And so then I started thinking, “Okay, what’s a more fun way to do this.?” Okay. What if I was famous? Well I can go work with artists and singers. So then I just started cold emailing and hustling through and started with small artists and then slowly graduated to larger artists and working with them. And so I got really good at understanding how to take a platform, which at the time social was all very broadcast focused, and turning it into something that was more two way communication focused. And it wasn’t like I sat down and thought it should be. I wasn’t thinking like, “Oh, these platforms should be two way.”

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Nik Sharma:

It was more about I would just test a bunch of different things because I had these accounts on my phone and oh, if we reply to a hater, tons of people get on it and start to come back with more replies. So it was like almost trying to figure out how to hack engagement. And so anyways, I did that for two years. Junior, senior year of high school. Graduated high school. Didn’t really get into any college that I wanted to go to. Found an ad tech company that was launching in San Francisco. Cold emailed the guy and said like, “Yo, let me come. I’ll do anything. Like, I’ll get coffee, I’ll get your salads. I’ll call whoever, whatever. I just want to learn and I want to do in that space.”

Nik Sharma:

And so he flew me up there and I was there for a one month internship. By the time that one month internship finished, I had helped acquire a company out of Brazil, which was a Facebook partner marketing company, like a PMD. And I was just like, “Wow, this is fascinating. I just learned so much in the last month and it wasn’t about history. It wasn’t about English or any of the things I wasn’t interested in. It was all the things I wanted to be a part of.” And so, then I decided, “All right, let me defer college for a year and stick to this. And so, I just kept getting deeper and deeper into that world working with brands, working with publishers, understanding how publishers monetize, understanding how brands deploy capital into different advertising channels and where they’re doing it and how they’re thinking about it from a creative perspective, a click-through perspective, bidding and inventory, all this stuff.

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Nik Sharma:

And I just got really into that world of ad tech. And so I spent two years there and then I ended up leaving just because I just wanted to do something new. And so as I was leaving a lot of these publishers that I was working with they were like, “Well, where are you going?” And I said, “I’m just chilling right now.” And they said, “Well, what if we just come with you and we can be like… you can be a freelancer for us.” So I said, “All right.” So working with these publishers and then at the same time, I’m tweeting about Hint water because I’m a fiend for Hint water. And so the CEO reached out and wanted to get coffee. So, got coffee with her. We started working on a project together and then about eight months later, I ended up getting hired by him to come internal. This is my new job now.

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Nik Sharma:

While I was at Hint for about two years, helped build the direct to consumer business to where it’s gotten to today. And then that was my introduction to this world of direct to consumer. It was basically coming into a brand where my job was performance marketing, and that’s where this whole term of DTC was made, during that time. And so, we were like we had a gun to our head every day from our CFO and to the point where we thought we were doing just an okay job. But then, when I come to New York for meetings or to visit vendors and partners out here, it was like, whoa, we’re absolutely killing it from a perspective of this industry.

Nik Sharma:

And we were doing things that were super innovative. I mean, we were doing creator white listing and publisher white listing back in 2017 when brands are just starting to think, now this is a viable channel. We were one of the first advertisers on places like The Hustle and Morning Brew. And I mean, we tested everything. We tried everything, you know, I came in with no formal education on how to build a marketing team or how to run a brand marketing department. And so everything I did was basically, instinct based or relationship based, or I tried to set up these… We have a monthly lunch with myself, Scott [Sorensen 00:08:33] from my team, and then Mike he was at Stitch Fix and now Greylock. This guy [Nisho 00:35:37], who was heading up marketing at Third Love.

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Nik Sharma:

And this guy, Aaron Driver, who was at Madison Reed, and we would get together every month and I didn’t have any formal things. So I was just, for me, it was a huge way to just learn and trade notes and share. And it’s something we still do today, but that then really just helped me learn and educate me on everything marketing. So I spent two years there. Then I got out to New York, joined an agency here for a couple months and learned that I didn’t really enjoy the agency life per se, just wasn’t what I was looking for having been on the brand side for two years. And so then I decided, all right, I’m going to go find something that is about to be series A or maybe currently raising. I can join as a head of revenue, how to growth type of thing.

Nik Sharma:

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And do a similar thing to what I did at Hint. And I cold emailed again. Cold emailing is like the most underrated thing, but cold emailed a bunch of founders and VC CMOs CEOs. Tried to sit down with as many of them and just learn about the ecosystem. This was also me just coming to New York. So I wanted to get to know the community here. And as I was doing this, we just had a ton of, or we meaning me, just had a ton of emails coming in saying like, “Hey, can we hire you for a couple months to help us with this? Can we hire you to help us with this?” It was like Lemon Perfect. “Can you help us launch this thing in LA?”

Nik Sharma:

Came back, Super Coffee, “Can you help us get direct to consumer with our business? We’re a big retail business.” said, “We’re a massive cafe business here. We’re really well known. How can we take the cafe experience and bring it online?” And so then I was just like, “All right, let me just focus on… I’ll spend this year basically consulting, doing one thing at a time and learning under the hood of these different businesses, understanding what works, what doesn’t work and see what I can do to help.”

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Nik Sharma:

And then at the end of 2019, this brand called Judy came to us and said, “We want to hire you. We have a brand, we have a product, we have a great story. I think there’s great opportunity here. We need somebody to help us with the digital side.” And so, that’s when I said, “All right, I think this was a lot of fun. I got to interact with a ton of really dope people. I got to work on some of the coolest projects and I think I’ll do this as a business.” And so then I started making a couple hires and fast forward to today, we’re basically a team of 10.

Nik Sharma:

We work with brands anywhere from the June Shines and the Chacha Matcha and the Judy’s of the world all the way to some of the largest brands in the world that supply half of the country’s alcohol, or they’re multi hundred million dollar brands that are household names. And we work with them on basically helping them from a standpoint of direct to consumer optimization, helping them get their infrastructure set up and basically getting them to a point where we can remove ourselves from the equation, then they can continue to scale.

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Loren Baker:

So you set everything up, hand the ball off to them and they can continue down that roadmap or whatever. And then maybe come back to you when something new is happening or whatever wh.n they need help along those lines. It sounds-

Nik Sharma:

Exactly.

Loren Baker:

… kind of a couple of things that you brought up were some interesting points. So one, cold email being underrated, right. Which is very true. Even as much complaining as we like to do about LinkedIn, I get so many LinkedIn like cold messages forwarded to me from like CMOs and CEOs that I work with. Like, “Oh, should we do this?” So they back. Not yet, but let’s vet this person first and then… But you’re right. Like stuff just kind of sticks out sometimes, right? And then at the same time, like moving to a new city and making those connections, like when I moved out to here to LA eight years ago, first thing I started doing was I set up an SEO meetup because there’s a lot of SEO people in town, but no centralized get together type thing.

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Loren Baker:

So that really helped me, like, it’s easier for me to get people to come to me as opposed to going out there and trying to meet this person and that person. So it was great. I set up a meetup. People started showing up, 10 people first time at a taco place. 20, they started doing WeWorks. 30, 40, 50, were showing up, getting people to speak. And then you just make connections that are trusted, right, at the same time. So balancing those both, the cold email component and moving to a new city and meeting new people is fantastic. And then you said you mentioned that agency life wasn’t your thing. But now you have a team of 10, right? So where do you get to that point where you’re not an agency? What’s the difference at the end of the day?

Nik Sharma:

Well, I mean, so what’s interesting, we don’t have a specific scope of work, for example. The way we work is we’re not going out and pitching companies to work with us. Right. Companies basically find us from some referral, whether it’s their investor, whether it’s an investment banker who’s looking to flip that company a year or two from now, whether it’s one of their consulting firms and they come to us and say, “Okay, this is our problem”… And then whatever the solution is to that pro… It could be anything from, we’re trying to figure out how to double our ad spend from 15 grand a day to 30 grand a day without increasing the acquisition costs.

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Nik Sharma:

It could be, we have built a $30 million business already, but we need to get to 50 and we see there’s an opportunity in paid media. How do we do this without diluting the brand equity? It could be, we have an incredible brand. We have great capital. And we’ve raised some capital and now how do we launch this thing into the world? And whatever the answer to their problem or their question is, that becomes the scope that we come in. And what we do is we try to come in for just about three to six months where we can come in, help answer that problem, help them learn exactly what we did so that they can replicate it internally. And then we move ourselves out. And if we’re done within six months or less, that means we did exactly what we were trying to do. Our goal is not to be like an ongoing agency. We’re not there for percent of spend. We’re trying to be in and out.

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Loren Baker:

Got you. Got you. So I was watching some other videos and interviews that you said you had done and I can’t remember the one which was about a two hour one, though. It was pretty long. And then one point that really jumped out to me was you were discussing the difference between landing pages that are part of a paid campaign and then PDPs, right? So where a landing page typically has that marketing funnel component where it’s teaching about a subject or a type of product, teaching the background on the product. And then you funnel down to the sale, as you scroll and as you’re reading. Whereas a PDP page, product, price, buy, and then maybe some information underneath. So what have you learned… like in the world of SEO a lot of the times we don’t work with landing pages because those landing pages aren’t set up for Google Organic. They’re set up for Google Ads or Facebook or Insta or whatever.

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Loren Baker:

What are some learnings that we can take as SEOs from the world of paid media, or paid influence and landing pages. It might be in a Zipify style format or whatever it may be, and then apply that to PDPs, which exists that people are finding when they’re searching Google either specifically for a product, or maybe they’re doing an unbranded search as well. But are there any learnings that you can apply to the normal PDPs of the site-

Nik Sharma:

Yeah.

Loren Baker:

… that you find out there?

Nik Sharma:

Yeah, there’s definitely a handful. So I think the main difference for people who didn’t see that video, the landing pages are basically focused on that full funnel experience that I like to talk about. That’s the concept of taking somebody who has no clue what you’re selling, what you’re pushing, what you’re promoting and that by the time they read through that page and get to the end, they should have no questions in their head. Everything that they were… if they have questions as they’re scrolling those should be answered as they scroll. There should be the proper social proof and reviews and external validation, but also a proper understanding of exactly what you’re getting and why you should buy it as a customer.

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Nik Sharma:

The PDPs, I think, are different in the sense that, like you mentioned, they’re more to push the sale. They’re coming from somebody. If you’re coming to a PDP, ideally you’re coming in organically because you’re a high intent user or you’re coming in maybe from Instagram. You tap the product, the PDP comes up. The whole goal there is to answer any questions specifically about that product versus the brand as a whole, the mission of the brand and why the brand exists. From an SEO perspective, we… Like Judy is such a great example. Judy is an emergency kit brand, and we get a ton of SEO traffic simply because we create an SEO content strategy for Judy where the goal was, how do we answer every question somebody could have around the concept of preparedness?

Nik Sharma:

And the first goal was like, we need to create an education hub where we can answer people’s questions, whether or not they’re Judy customers. Obviously, if they are, they can come to our site and get more questions answered. They might have, or learn more about preparedness and what it takes to prepare your family. But if somebody has no means to buy the product, they have no ability to buy the product, maybe they live internationally, they should still be able to come to our site and learn what they need to prepare. If you go to the Judy site, you can actually learn everything you would need in your emergency kit for an earthquake or for a wildfire, whatever it is, regardless of whether or not you buy Judy. And so I think like with SEO in general, that has to be the thinking or the mindset going into that is like, “Okay, if we want to be someone who generates traffic through SEO, we need to think less about like, talking about a product, but more about answering questions that people have around the topic of the industry or the vertical we’re in.

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Nik Sharma:

So when people search questions, like, “What do college students need in dorms to prepare for emergencies?” Like, that’s what we’re trying to rank for. Not the words, earthquake kit. I mean, we are, but that’s not going to-

Loren Baker:

Happen in time too, right?

Nik Sharma:

Exactly. We want to rank for questions. And that’s another thing too, is like, when you think about the rise in just the way that people are interacting with search nowadays, it’s so different than like, when I think about how my parents use Google, right? Like when they use Google, they assume that Google… You just have to type keywords and you have to keep using different keywords to get to something. Whereas more millennials and gen Z people, we’re just writing full questions into Google.

Nik Sharma:

And obviously Google has become more advanced and it learns to answer questions that way. But you now have things like the Knowledge Panel, you have things like Search Result Zero, have things like Google Home, or when you ask a question that result zero becomes the answer. And so it’s like just as like all these page have evolved from billboards to Facebook Ads or landing pages and conversion optimization. There’s so much optimization that has evolved in the SEO world. And I think that so many brands when they think about their own SEO, they’re thinking about, “How do I rank for the few words around my product versus thinking about how do I rank from a standpoint of educating or answering questions that my potential consumers, whether they’re buying today or a year from now, how can we help them answer their questions to show A, we’re a credible source, B, maybe we’ll get an email out of it through a pop-up and C, hopefully if we’re lucky, we’ll get a share out of the piece of content that might bring somebody else to come and buy the product.”

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Loren Baker:

That’s true. I think a lot of the time, like one mistake companies definitely make is they look at like an support or whatever tool it is and export of keywords in search volume. And they say, “I’m going to go for the search volume a hundred thousand, because that’s what’s going to drive traffic. Right. But then if you hit the next page, next page, next page, multiple times, and you get to the search volumes that are in the high hundreds, the mid thousands, et cetera, all of that can add up at the end of the day. And typically what happens is that everyone goes after that hundred thousand, which is, if you’re trying to sell a supplement, chances are that that term has a hundred thousand search volume is probably going to be a health line, probably would be multiple different, like large established brands and breaking through that may never happen.

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Loren Baker:

Right. But there is this middle ground of… it’s almost like the NFL draft. Like everyone’s talking about the first round draft pick, right. But it’s GM’s that do their research that can find those steels in the third, fourth, fifth, even six rounds are the ones that really come out of it at the end of the day. So if you can look for those opportunities where it’s more informational, maybe a little bit less transactional, but if you’re setting up a solid blog and a solid content strategy over time, all of those posts are going to attract links. People are going to share them, and it’s going to be something that Judy or another brand could integrate into their email nurturing strategy, right? If someone does maybe abandon the cart, why follow up with them with an email saying, “Hey, you forgot to buy your product. Here’s a coupon code,” that might work.

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Loren Baker:

It may not, but if they have a specific… Maybe it is an earthquake preparedness kit in their cart, following up with them about great information that they already know the brand, but how do you go beyond that coupon code? Right. Give them great information that they’re going to even trust the brand more and then they would, “Yeah, I should buy that, shouldn’t I.”

Nik Sharma:

Absolutely. And that’s also where everybody loves to talk about the future of personalization. I think SEO is such a great channel to think about personalization because somebody is coming in from something that they very much searched to get to your page, whether it’s the fact that the coupon code on the page that leads to the product is the keyword they came in on or related to the topic they’re reading about. Or even like you mentioned, a follow-up email that goes back. There’s so many ways to use the information of the inputs that got you to that page to then get that person back.

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Loren Baker:

Yeah, absolutely. There’s a ton of touch points and a ton of data that you can utilize on that front too. Speaking of SEO, a lot of talk in the SEO industry and community is very, very front-facing. The ability to rank and what page do you read? What position do you rank for? How much traffic are you getting on that click? Right. And I think for years, that’s what a lot of maybe SEO consultants focused on. Maybe not in-house because in-house was a lot more information than data that you have at your disposal. But sometimes consultants focus a little bit more on the polish and not what’s behind the scenes, right.

Loren Baker:

So one thing I’ve found in the past couple of years is really digging into what the lifetime value is of the SEO sale, right? What the average order value is, how to increase that, how to, especially with Google User Experience updates, like how to make sure that your site is functioning incredibly fast, not just from a conversion perspective, but to tell Google that, “Hey, you should search this because people aren’t going to hit the back button.” They’re going to be able to load this if they’re on a phone in the subway somewhere, they’re going to be able to load this page. It’s fantastic. What are some of the, especially in the world of Shopify and big commerce and new commerce, what are some of the apps and ad-ons that you feel are essential to increasing that lifetime customer value and then also the average order value from upsells and everything else. And then also, communicating with the customer, whether they’ve abandoned the cart, maybe they bought one product. How do you get them back? Any tips on your go-to suite of apps that you typically use on your projects?

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Nik Sharma:

Yeah. I mean, one thing actually I learned from a friend named Kevin Miller, who’s an SEO guy in LA. He always advises me to use AMP. So when you’re having traffic that comes straight from Google, whether it’s landing pages, whether they are articles, utilize AMP as much as you can, because like you said, if somebody is in the subway, somebody is in a lower internet area, AMP is Google’s tool to help you load fast. I think, secondly, when you think about getting somebody in, SEO is very top of funnel focus traffic. I’ve seen a lot of companies where SEO might not even convert to… Like there’s a cohort of people where they might come to the site, they learn, but they’re not giving you their email at all, like a 1% input. But then there’re others where if it’s like, for example, anything to do with legal or medical or things like that, they’ll have no problem giving you that email and looking for more information and whatnot.

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Nik Sharma:

But I think the first thing is optimizing the user experience, making sure that that’s legit. I think the second thing is, as you start getting somebody towards the cart, you can use something like Klaviyo for your email, which is what we normally use for our commerce platforms. If you’re using Shopify for your CMS of commerce and check out the new Shopify, there’s apps like co-op commerce, which are great for upselling. There’s apps, like Smart RR. Smart RR, which make the subscription process an incredibly easy one and also very easy to integrate on different pages because there are no code solution.

Nik Sharma:

But then after that, I think, one thing I think people don’t do enough of is understanding what channel people came in on. So whether it was SEO or Facebook Ads or word of mouth, or an influencer and then tailoring the first 30 days of content they receive after, based on how they came in. So if you know, for example, that somebody came in through an ambassador of the company, they’re probably… well, step before that. You want to understand your LTV by channel, right? So if you know that if somebody comes in as an ambassador, they’re probably going to have a higher LTV.

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Nik Sharma:

Then maybe it’s like somebody who came in from Facebook and Instagram, because those can be pretty targeted. And then, SEO’s in there as well. But you want to understand based on where they’re coming from, how much education they might’ve gotten before they made that purchase, what their LTV is, serve them different content so that A, you might get a higher lifetime value out of them. B, you might be able to help cross sell or upsell them into different products you sell or different categories of products based on what they came in from.

Nik Sharma:

But I think you can do most of that between things like Klaviyo, between Tido for analytics, which gives you great cohort analysis by channel or by campaign or by product sold or by coupon code. And then, companies like Smart RR for subscription, co-op commerce for upsells. I mean, all the apps are there and it’s just up to you to put the time in and try to make it work.

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Loren Baker:

Fantastic. Before we go, we’re half hour in already, which is-

Nik Sharma:

That’s fast.

Loren Baker:

Yeah, I know, right. I’m going to keep this going for a little. Before we go, it is Mother’s Day this weekend. And I bought my wife one of those… it’s a Venus. The freeze dried version is in a hat box. Right. Probably more… You know what I’m talking about?

Nik Sharma:

No.

Loren Baker:

I may have brought this up. Okay. So, it’s in a round box, like a round hat box with deep… Sorry, not deep fried, freeze dried roses in it. That sounds like a… I started the other day, but it’s funny because as soon as I started searching for them or clicked, I actually I saw an Instagram ad and I think they’re one of the first to market. Now I’m being bombarded by copycat brands, right?

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Loren Baker:

1-800 Flowers came out with their own version, there’s one called a Million Roses. And basically the idea is you buy it and they last a year, right? So you don’t have to buy the stuff over and over and over again. This is probably going to backfire on me because she’s going to want another one in a month or something. But that was my rationale for doing it. Point being though is that I bought one product. And then I’m sure you’ve seen this multiple times on Instagram, as soon as you put out that interest data point out there, you’re bombarded by similar products. This happens to me all the time. I’ll go to the gym, check in on the gym and the next thing I know I’m getting all these, like Gym Bro t-shirts with skulls on them, recommended to me. Or I post something about basketball and I’m getting like DribbleUp and all of these other brands recommended to me. But there’s so many similar brands, sometimes it’s very hard to actually remember what the brand is.

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Loren Baker:

So one tip that I saw out there in SEO, Twitter was to optimize for something like the flower brand on Instagram or the flower brand in a hatbox on Instagram or, oh, the basketball that so-and-so influencer works with or something like that. So that’s good from an unbranded perspective. But do you have any tips on building brand searches? How to keep up to remember your brand at that first moment and then search for you in the future?

Nik Sharma:

Yeah. I mean, I think it’s two ways, right? One is the exact way you said it. Like if you search emergency kit on Instagram, you’ll see Judy as the first thing. But I think secondly, it comes from in the creative itself that these brands are putting out. It’s a science, right? It’s not just an art. It’s also equally a science. So things like making sure that the brand name is prevalent upon the first second that they see it, making sure that within the first three seconds you understand the punchline to what this product does, within the first five seconds you see the product, you see what you’re getting out of it and you understand why you’re going to buy this. But I think for something like that, the main thing is, is one is consistency, right? If you’re the emergency kit brand on Instagram, you’ve got to have a uniform set of creative that people recognize across the multiple ads they might see. And then I think secondly is just making sure that the brand itself is prevalent from the first second.

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Nik Sharma:

The other thing too, is that in a world where Shopify and Facebook ads are so low barrier, there’s thousands of stores that are pushing products, but there’s not thousands of those that are brands, right? If you look at a company that sells yoga mats, or even these Gym Bro shirts, like a lot of them are literally, they’re print on demand stores or might be drop-shipped from somewhere. But it’s not like a brand that somebody is going to remember.

Nik Sharma:

So I think even a step before all this when you think about running ads for anything, it’s like taking a photo and stretching it out on like a Microsoft Word, right? The more you stretch it, the blurrier it gets. And the thing that you’re stretching in ads is the brand equity itself. But when you’re just running ads for something that doesn’t really have a foundation or a brand in itself, it’s not going to go that far. You’re not going to get the person to remember to search it. But when you do, then all the other things work, right? Your search interest goes up just as a by-product of really good social ads. Your paid search along with your SEO goes up. People remember things about it and I think it just comes back to making sure the brand makes a statement at the beginning that you then remember to go back to later.

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Loren Baker:

Nice, Nik Sharma. It’s been a pleasure having you today. I’m going to follow up. We’ll do some blog posts on SEJ out of this. Kind of re-introduce you to the SEO world a bit because you’re a wealth of knowledge, man. I wish I had blocked off an hour. Maybe not a couple. That was pretty long, but maybe an hour or so for this. But thanks again. For all of you that are listening today for more SEO news, please go to searchenginejournal.com/subscribe to subscribe to our daily SEO newsletter. SEJ today and get that in your mailbox every morning so you’re not missing out on all of the great SEO information and ever-changing things in our industry. Again, that’s searchenginejournal.com/subscribe. And then after you subscribe to our newsletter, go to nik.co/subscribe to subscribe to Nik’s D2C email newsletter. How often does it go out Nik?

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Nik Sharma:

Every Sunday and-

Loren Baker:

Perfect.

Nik Sharma:

Every Sunday and I try to make it extremely tactical. The goal is that everybody can take notes from that email and then on Monday, apply it with little to no cost of application.

Loren Baker:

I love it. Goodbye Sunday, you get that newsletter in, figure out what you’re going to do all week and you got the plan. I love it. I love it. Nik, it’s been a pleasure. I’m going to follow up with you about maybe getting you on the blog and then everyone, thanks so much for joining today. It’s been great and have a good weekend.

 

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